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Salyut 6 Mission Patch

Salyut 6

the fourth Soviet orbital space station

Salyut 6 was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on September 29, 1977. With Salyut 6, the Soviet space station program evolved from short-duration to long-duration stays.

The station had two docking ports, which permitted refueling and resupply by automated Progress freighters. Progress docked automatically at the aft port, and was then opened and unlocked by cosmonauts on the station. Transfer of fuel to the station took place automatically under supervision from the ground. The second docking port allowed the long-duration resident crews to receive visiting short-duration crews.

the Salyut 6 Space Station

Salyut 6 was visited by five long-duration crews and eleven short-term crews. Short-duration crews often included cosmonaut-researchers from Soviet bloc countries or countries sympathetic to the Soviet Union. Vladimir Remek of Czechoslovakia, the first space traveler not from the U.S. or U.S.S.R., visited Salyut 6 in 1978. The station also hosted cosmonauts from Hungary, Poland, Romania, Cuba, Mongolia, Vietnam, and East Germany.

An experimental transport logistics spacecraft called Cosmos 1267 docked with Salyut 6 in 1982. Originally designed for the Almaz program, Cosmos 1267 proved that large modules could dock automatically with space stations, a major step toward the multimodular Mir station and the International Space Station.

The station was deorbited on July 29, 1982.

Specifications

Length: 15.8 meters
Maximum Diameter: 4.15 meters
Habitate Volume: 90 cubic meters
Weight at Launch: 19,824 kilograms
Number of Solar Arrays: 3
Span of Solar Arrays: 17 meters
Area of Solar Arrays: 51 square meters
Number of Docking Ports: 2
Total Occupation Period: 683 days

Missions and Crews
visiting missions are in italics

Mission Name Mission Dates Crew Notes
EO-1 December 10, 1977 - March 16, 1978 Yuri Romanenko, Georgi Grechko broke a record set on board Skylab, staying aboard for 96 days
EP-1 January 10, 1978 - January 16, 1978 Oleg Makarov, Vladimir Dzhanibekov  
EP-2 March 2, 1978 - March 10, 1978 Aleksei Gubarev, Valdimir Remek Intercosmos flight
EO-2 June 15, 1978 - November 2, 1978 Vladimir Kovalyonok, Aleksandr Ivanchenkov 140 days
EP-3 June 27, 1978 - July 5, 1978 Pyotr Klimuk, Miroslaw Hermaszewski Intercosmos flight
EP-4 August 26, 1978 - November 2, 1978 Valery Bykovsky, Sigmund Jähn Intercosmos flight
EO-3 February 25, 1979 - August 19, 1979 Vladimir Lyakhov and Valery RyuminVladimir Lyakhov, Valery Ryumin set a new space endurance record of 175 days
  April 10, 1979 - April 12, 1979 Nikolay Rukavishnikov, Georgi Ivanov Intercosmos flight; failed docking
  June 6, 1979 - August 19, 1979   launched empty to replace Soyuz 33; landed with long-duration crew
EO-4 April 9, 1980 - October 11, 1980 Leonid Popov, Valery Ryumin 185 days
EP-5 May 26, 1980 - July 31, 1980 Valery Kubasov, Bertalan Farkas Intercosmos flight
EP-6 June 5, 1980 - June 9, 1980 Yuri Malyshev, Vladimir Aksyonov  
EP-7 July 23, 1980 - October 11, 1980 Viktor Gorbatko, Pham Tuan Intercosmos flight
EP-8 September 18, 1980 - September 26, 1980 Yuri Romanenko, Arnaldo Tamayo Mendez Intercosmos flight
EO-5 November 27, 1980 - December 10, 1980 Leonid Kizim, Oleg Makarov, Gennady Strekalov a repair mission lasting 12 days
EO-6 March 12, 1981 - May 26, 1981 Vladimir Kovalyonok, Viktor Savinykh 75 days
EP-9 March 22, 1981 - March 30, 1981 Vladimir Dzhanibekov, Zhugderdemidiyn Gurragcha Intercosmos flight
EP-10 May 14, 1981 - May 22, 1981 Leonid Popov, Dumitru Prunariu Intercosmos flight

WEB SOURCE
NSSDC Master Catalog Display: Spacecraft nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov

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This page was last updated on 05/27/2017.