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the U.S. Supreme Court building

Supreme Court

CONTENTS
First Meeting of the Supreme Court
First Meeting of the Supreme Court
The Supreme Court first assembled on February 1, 1790, in the Merchants Exchange Building in New York City.
Supreme Court Justices in 1958
Supreme Court Justices in 1958
David Josiah Brewer
David Josiah Brewer
was named to the Supreme Court in 1889, and served there until his death in 1910. An active member of the Court, he often voted with the majority in striking down progressive laws restricting property rights.
Sandra Day O'Connor
Sandra Day O'Connor
became the first woman Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, and served on that body until retiring in 2006. During her tenure, she was known for being a fairly strict interpreter of the Constitution, and was frequently the key swing vote in controversial cases, including the Court's upholding of Roe v. Wade.
Oliver Ellsworth
Oliver Ellsworth
was one of the proponents of a two-house Congress, and was chairman of the committee that organized the federal judiciary. He became the second Chief Justice in 1796, and served in that capacity until resigning for health reasons in 1800.
Lewis Franklin Powell, Jr.
Lewis Franklin Powell, Jr.
was respected for carrying one of the heaviest loads of pro bono work in all of Richmond, Virginia. He was named to the Supreme Court in 1971, and served there until retiring in 1987. During his tenure was often the "swing vote" in many of the Court's decisions.
Abraham Fortas
Abraham Fortas
served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court from 1965 to 1969. His 1968 nomination for the position of Chief Justice was blocked by the U.S. Senate, and he subsequently resigned from the Court amidst allegations of wrongdoing.
Potter Stewart
Potter Stewart
served on the Supreme Court from 1958 to 1981.
John Marshall
John Marshall
was the third Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Under his leadership, the Court became a vigorous and equal third branch of government. The structure of the government was made clear, and the Court's authority to make the final decision as to the consitutionality of the government's actions was firmly established.
Harlan Fiske Stone
Harlan Fiske Stone
served on the Supreme Court from 1925 to 1946, including as Chief Justice beginning in 1941. To date, he is the only justice to have occupied all nine seniority positions on the bench, having moved from most junior Associate Justice to most senior Associate Justice and then to Chief Justice.
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