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Tennessee

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Facts and Figures
Origin of Name From "Tanasie," the name of a Cherokee village in the region. Area (rank) 42,146 (36th). Population (rank) 6,495,978 (17th). Capital Nashville. First Explored By Hernando de Soto in 1540. Admitted to Union (rank) June 1, 1796 (16th).

State of Franklin
Franklin
On August 23, 1784, three counties in what was then western North Carolina declared themselves independent of North Carolina. After establishing a provisional government, the counties then petitioned for admission to the Union as the State of Franklin. The petition failed, but Franklin did ultimately become part of what is now Tennessee.

David Crockett
David Crockett
Despite having virtually no formal education, "Davy" Crockett was a strong speaker and natural storyteller. He particularly enjoyed telling stories about himself, and was prone to exaggerating his image as an Indian fighter and frontiersman, especially when doing so could earn him "political points."

Sevier County
Sevier County
Named for John Sevier, the first Governor of Tennessee, Sevier County was formed in 1794. Despite Tennessee being a Confederate state during the Civil War, most of the county's residents remained loyal to the Union during the Civil War. The county seat is Sevierville, the eighth-oldest city in the state.

White County
White County
Created in 1806, White County was named for Revolutionary War soldier and early settler John White. The county seat and largest city is Sparta.

Chattanooga
Chattanooga
is the fourth largest city in Tennessee. Its name comes from Chat-to-to-noog-gee, a Creek word meaning "mountain rising to a point," which refers to nearby Lookout Mountain. The city gained international fame with the 1941 recording of "Chattanooga Choo Choo" by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra.

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