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The Robinson Library >> American History >> United States: General History and Description >> Revolution to the Civil War, 1775/1783-1861 >> Early 19th Century, 1801-1845 > Andrew Jackson's Administration, 1829-1837 >> Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson and the Battle of Horseshoe Bend

In 1814, Andrew Jackson took command of a volunteer force of 2,000 men in a campaign against the Creek Indians, who had massacred several hundred settlers at Fort Mims in the Mississippi Territory (now Alabama). A serious shortage of supplies and food made military operations difficult for Jackson. He also had to put down two mutinies when some of his men threatened to desert.

The decisive battle of the campaign was fought on March 27, 1814, near a Creek village on the Horseshoe Bend of the Tallapoosa River, near present-day Alexander City. Jackson allowed the women and children to cross the river to safety before he attacked, then his men nearly wiped out the entire Indian force of 800 braves. He then dictated peace terms to the Creek, who gave up 23,000,000 acres of land in present-day Georgia and Alabama.

Jackson dictating peace terms to the Creek
Jackson dictating peace terms to the Creek

SEE ALSO
Alabama
Georgia

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The Robinson Library >> American History >> United States: General History and Description >> Revolution to the Civil War, 1775/1783-1861 >> Early 19th Century, 1801-1845 > Andrew Jackson's Administration, 1829-1837 >> Andrew Jackson

This page was last updated on April 12, 2017.