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As of April 17, 2014 there are 2,920 pages of information on this site.
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NEWEST TITLES
Pseudaelurus
Pseudaelurus
roamed the plains of Eurasia, Africa, and North America between 20 and 8 million years ago. The first cat to immigrate into the Americas, it is believed to be the ancestor of all modern cats, including the domestic house cat.
Jesse Ramsden
Jesse Ramsden
was known as the best designer and manufacturer of mathematical, astronomical, surveying, and navigational instruments in England in the late-1700's. He also invented the dividing engine, an improved theodolite, a pyrometer, and an eyepiece for reflecting telescopes.
Caligula
Caligula
succeeded Tiberius as Emperor in 37 A.D. Initially very popular among the citizenry, his popularity began waning after he began showing signs of mental instability less than a year after assuming the throne. Known for humiliating Senate members, killing members of his family, and undertaking seemingly foolish and expensive projects, he became the first Roman Emperor to be assassinated in 41.
President Wilson Asks Congress for a Declaration of War
President Wilson Asks Congress to Declare War on Germany
On April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson told a joint session of Congress that "The world must be safe for democracy." Congress ultimately agreed with Wilson and, on April 6, issued a formal declaration of war against Germany.
Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus)
Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus)
The only bear native to South America is found throughout the more mountainous regions of the Andes from western Venezuela south to Bolivia, as well as northwestern Argentina into Panama. It is named for the spectacle-like markings on its face, which are unique to each individual bear.
Eryops
Eryops
was one of the largest land amphibians of the Early Permian Period (295-270 million years ago), with a length of up to 6.5 feet and weight of up to 200 pounds. Looking much like a modern crocodile, it likely moved and fed in a manner very much like the crocodile.
Vampire Squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis)
The Vampire Squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis)
is named for its jet-black skin (which can appear red or purple under certain light conditions), the cape-like webbing between its arms, and eyes that appear red under most light conditions. It spends its entire life at a depth of 4,900 to 8,200 feet, where there is virtually no light, very little oxygen, and the temperature rarely exceeds 43 degrees Fahrenheit.
Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
was founded as part of a Benedictine monastery by Edward the Confessor in 1042. William the Conqueror was crowned in the Abbey in 1066, and every British monarch since (but two) has been crowned there. Over 3,000 notable Britons are honored with either a tomb or a memorial within either the main church or one of its "side structures."
Big  Ben
Big Ben
is the common name for a huge bell that chimes the hours for a huge clock near the top of a tower at the Houses of Parliament in London, England. It is also sometimes incorrectly used to refer to the tower and clock.
Tower of London
Tower of London
Built as a fortress by William the Conqueror in 1066, the Tower of London also served as a royal residence until the mid-16th century and as a prison until the mid-20th century. It is still an official royal residence, but is today more commonly known as a popular tourist attraction.

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